Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

染の小道 | April 28, 2017

Scroll to top

Top

川のギャラリー River Gallery

両端を川に渡したロープに反物を留めて、向こう岸に渡す

妙正寺川に「反物」を架ける

川筋の染工場の職人たちが川のあちらこちらで染め物の水洗いをする風景は、昭和30年代頃までは落合・中井の風物詩でした。当時の街の記憶を、現代に甦らせます。「染の小道」の趣旨に賛同する染色業仲間などから寄付を募ってかき集めた江戸更紗や小紋染めなど、色とりどりの反物(たんもの)が川面に踊ります。

反物は切って縫い合わせると着物となります。反物のサイズは幅36~40cm、長さ12~13mでほぼ統一されています。小柄な人の着物は深く縫い合わせ、大柄な人は浅く縫い合わせるなどして調整し、貴重な布を余す所なく使います。

着物はほどいて、つなげて、洗い張りをした後で仕立て直しができます。小柄な祖母から背の高い孫へ、縫い直しながら着物を引き継いでいくことができるのです。ほどいて反物の形に戻す工程は「洗い張り」、蒸気を当てて生地を伸ばし形を整える工程は「湯のし」と呼ばれ、それぞれ専門の技術者に依頼します。現在ではこうした技術者の数も減ってきましたが、落合・中井周辺には数件が今も活動しています。

Kimono Textiles (Tan mono) on the Myoshoji River

Dyeing factories on the course of the river and workers washing dyed goods in water were typical features in Ochiai and Nakai until 1950’s. This event is aimed to recall those memories of the city in our own day. 50 to 60 pieces of kimono cloth including colorful ones of Edo Sarasa and Komon, donated by dyeing workers who support the event, will be dancing on the river surface. They will be placed along the path between Myoshojigawa Jisaibashi and Tashobashi. Myoshojigawa Jisaibashi is located in front of Nakai Station on Seibu Shinjuku Line.

The beautiful cloths hanging in the “RIVER GALLERY” are called “Tan mono”. Tan mono are cut and sewn into kimonos. Almost all Tan mono is the same size. By adjusting the depth of the seams,the same Tan mono can fit a small woman or a large woman without wasting any cloth. Even if a small grandmother passes down her kimono to her tall granddaughter, it can be re-sewn to fit her. This allows kimonos to be handed down from generation to generation without waste.